In the cellar

We harvest necessarily by hand, using small cases. 3 or 4 days before starting we prepare a pied de cuve to start spontaneous fermentation.

​​​​​​​Whole grapes are softly pressed and the resulting must decants at low temperature. After 24 hours the cleaned must is separated from rough lees, which have settled on the bottom of the tank. We add  the pied de cuve.



At this point sugar concentration is supervised through a saccharimeter two times a day, all over the alcoholic fermentation. This is fundamental to keep under control how the fermentation evolves.

In case fermentation slows down we proceed with pumping-over so to feed yeasts with oxygen and avoid smell of reduction.

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After alcoholic fermentation has come to an end we pour one or more times and then wine can rest so to refine and mature on its own noble lees.

With the help of Winter cold temperatures and a slight clarification through clay we finally reach a clear and stable wine.

It is now time to proceed with filtration and then bottling.
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Bottles rest for a few months before being ready for selling.